Circe by Madeline Miller, a review

“He showed me his scars, and in return he let me pretend that I had none.”

Circe by Madeline Miller

I was a huge fan of Madeline Miller’s Song of Achilles (read my review here) so you can imagine I was thrilled when I received a copy of her new book Circe to help while away the hours while I waited for my very overdue baby while I was on maternity leave earlier this year.

In Miller’s retelling of the Circe from Homer’s Odyssey, Circe is the unloved daughter of Helios, the Titan sun god, and Perse, a sea nymph. Overlooked by her mother for lacking the beauty that might secure her a marriage to a god, and thus her mother’s social standing, she is left to her own devices and mocked by her more attractive siblings. When the abandoned brother she has raised from infancy rejects her too, she is desperate for any affection and discovers that she has the power of witchcraft. But this sees her banished from her father’s palace and placed on an island in complete isolation, where she truly comes to know herself and her power.

While I very much enjoyed reading Circe, and Miller’s writing is on point as always, I thought it was interesting that it was branded as a feminist retelling of the Greek myth. For me, even throughout Miller’s version, much of our perception of Circe is derived from her interactions with the male characters. We see Circe’s struggle to find her place in her powerful and abusive father’s court; the terror she strikes into Glaucus, the human she falls in love with but who abandons her when she gifts him divinity; Apollo who takes her as a lover, but for the novelty more than anything else; the men who rape her and set her on her course of turning men into pigs…the only men she feels comfortable with are brilliant humans like Daedalus and Odysseus, but even then her relationships with those are complicated by the existence of their sons. Even when she seems to achieve a degree of freedom, it is always the result of having to bargain with the male world, I suppose that you could argue that that’s the system that every woman operates within but even when Penelope comes onto the scene and in scenes with Parsiphae, I’m not convinced that Circe would pass the Bechdel test.

As for the happy ending that Circe is said to receive in both myth and this retelling, her character certainly deserves it. But I couldn’t help but feel that it was another example of her giving something away for a man.

Oh and if this leaves you wondering, as I always have, “How do you say Circe?” The correct Greek pronunciation would be Kirky, but Miller says that she finds Sirsee to be more accessible to the modern reader.

3 thoughts on “Circe by Madeline Miller, a review

  1. Ashleigh

    Ahh this is one of my favourite books! Though I definitely see what you mean about questioning whether it’s a feminist retelling or not since so many of her situations are determined by men. I’ve never really called it a “feminist” retelling, just a retelling, but I’d say that about most retellings really. Being feminist doesn’t mean removing men completely from the story, but I guess it then rests on how we interpret her interactions with them. It’s a hard balance!

    Reply
    1. Siobhan Post author

      I really enjoyed it and I think she’s a fantastic writer, I’d just seen all these puffs about it being the feminist retelling. I suppose it is in the sense that it gives Circe a voice that she’s traditionally lacked and gave her a sympathetic backstory rather than her just appearing as a threat to Odysseus. I’d recommend it to everyone though, I passed it straight on to my brother who enjoyed it.

      Reply
  2. Pingback: Words for Wednesday, the scars we carry | The Book and Biscuit

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