Alice in Wonderland Statue in Central Park

Central Park Alice in Wonderland Statue with ChildrenI love that the Alice in Wonderland Memorial Statue for Margarita Delacorte in Central Park is intended for children to play on, it’s incredibly charming, having been polished smooth by children’s hands since it arrived in the park in 1959, and you can understand why it’s such a popular landmark to photograph.

 

However, something that you never seem to see is the beautiful quotations around the base of the statue, which were perhaps my favourite thing about it:

Alice Twinkle twinkle Little Bat Alice Speak Roughly to your little boy Alice Twas Brillig Alice Tweedle Dum and Tweedle Dee Battle

I found the last one really moving, it’s the dedication from the husband of the woman who the statue is dedicated to. I wish I could find out a bit more about her, this is just so beautiful. The kind of memorial you’d want if you could choose.

Alice in Wonderland Central Park Dedication

 

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6 thoughts on “Alice in Wonderland Statue in Central Park

  1. bookpolygamist

    How gorgeous and such a lovely tribute! I always think public art can add character to a park, especially if it’s something like this which doubles as play equipment. There’s a Peter Pan themed statue in a park in my city (Perth, Western Australia) which I always loved as a child, and kids were always encouraged to climb all over it πŸ™‚ If you fancy reading about its history here’s a nice entry: http://www.publicartaroundtheworld.com/Peter_Pan_Statue.html

    Thanks for sharing the photos!

    Reply
    1. Siobhan Post author

      Hello, thanks for sharing this. I’ve never seen the one in Kensington Gardens (my next outing perhaps?) so will have to go along and pretend that I am in Perth. Someone should set up a blog in which they visit the Peter statues around the world. I bet they’d get a book deal if they timed it to coincide with a big Peter Pan anniversary πŸ™‚

      Reply
  2. spockssister

    Jabberwocky is one of my favourite poems. I can recite it (although I’m not sure I can write it out). I love the fact that it makes complete sense whilst being made up of nonsense words. A very powerful and clever piece of writing.
    There’s probably a literary term for making sense using nonsense, something to do with onomatopoeia I expect. Interestingly, politicians are very good at the reverse: making nonsense out of sense. That, I believe has a strong connection with reductio ad absurdum.
    πŸ˜€

    Reply

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